Category: Editorial

Editorials and opinions from members of the Lancaster LGBTQ+ community

On Searching for Higher Education while Trans

Ellie Cochran

December 16, 2022

I am a mixed-race, disabled, transfemme individual living in the United States.

During my initial college search around 2014, I would sometimes experience an odd, almost physical sensation while touring campuses around the country. I couldn’t put my finger on it, but something about the experience felt very alienating. I didn’t feel like I belonged there, and I didn’t feel like I belonged anywhere.

As a trans person, it’s very difficult for me to just “be myself” in public. I’ve been systemically harassed by police, accosted by strangers, and denied access to public spaces. I’ve been denied employment, denied the right to self-identify on official documents, and denied the right to live authentically. I’ve been denied the right to be myself, and I’ve been denied the right to be safe.

To exist freely and authentically is not often a privilege that is allowed to a trans prospective student. It can be hard to let one’s guard down far enough to participate in the college experience, to make friends, to build connections, to ask questions. You never know what latent prejudice lies behind a passing remark, and you’re always expected to be a spokesperson for your entire community. It’s exhausting.

This is the aspect of the trans education experience that must be discussed; the college experience is difficult for everybody, but students in minority groups must contend with increased stress levels and environmental diffculties outside of assignments and campus life. Mental health issues such as depression, anxiety, and PTSD, which occur more frequently in trans populations due to our targeted minority status, can present difficulties in executive function. This results in students who may appear to be floundering to the outside observer, but who are in fact trying their best against impossible odds.

In my search for grauduate schools, I’ve found that the same issues persist. Even some of the most inclusive colleges and universities are not always necessarily affirming in their systemic assumptions. When entering information into paperwork, forms, and applications, I am often forced to choose from a limited number of options which do not accurately reflect the reality of my demographics and identity. This can be frustrating and confusing at best, or retraumatizing and dysphoria-inducing at worst.

I am often asked to provide documentation of my identity, which can be difficult to obtain for many trans individuals. The process of obtaining legal documentation of my identity is expensive, and can take years. I’m fortunate to be in a position where I can afford to pursue the process, but many trans prospective students are not. This can be an invisible barrier to entry which is difficult to overcome.

It is my hope that by sharing information about these issues, I can help make these invisible barriers more evident. Access to information and higher education must be equitable, and it is our responsibility as a society to make sure that our students are not being held back by systemic issues which are out of their control. Let’s share our voices and our experiences, and together we can create a more equitable world for all.

This editorial was originally published on the Sintelligent Design weblog.

Dr. Adam Lake on World AIDS Day, and HIV/AIDS Stigma

Lancaster LGBTQ+ Coalition

December 7, 2022

In talking with others I often get the sense that many people think of HIV and AIDS as something in the past. Unfortunately, this isn’t true, we have more people living with HIV than ever before, in large part thanks to effective medications, which have become more tolerable, and easier to take than ever before.

We also now have medications that can prevent HIV, which can certainly put minds at ease for people who might be at risk of HIV. World Aids Day is also a time when we remember people who have died from HIV and AIDS. Because of the deep stigma surrounding this disease, sometimes even family members don’t know the people that they love are living with it, or have died from it. In a time when HIV is both so easily treatable and preventable, one of the main barriers is stigma.

So if you’re reading this, the one thing that I want you to do is think about what comes to mind if you imagine somebody love being diagnosed with HIV. Do you want to know where they got it from? What did they do? Do you worry about being close to them again?

Just like any disease, we should be rallying to support those who live with this. As soon as we associate a disease with immorality, we heap stigma on top of stigma. This is no good for anyone. HIV thrives in the dark.

So this World Aids Day, I ask that you be a light in the dark, and leave no place where HIV can hide.

Queer State of the Union

Karen Foley

October 22, 2021

“I have no room in my heart for hatred and frankly, I do not have time for intolerance.

Dr. Rachel Levine, Secretary of Health

Pride is this Sunday. We are happy to attend, but we do not run Pride anymore. Marginalized communities too often split and divide in the face of adversity. Lancaster LGBTQ+ Coalition was founded because of this exact issue. We are too often ready to cut people off, divide and blame when things get hard. We need to support and hold space for every intersection of our community. We don’t have to like each other, but we need to move together in the same general direction or we will continue to stay marginalized. We are happy to support, because know how important it is for us to celebrate; Pride gives us a day to be in the majority, and lets us connect to our love for each other and for the queer kid in Ephrata who made it through the year despite the odds. This year is different. 

We all believe that all children should be protected and given opportunities to live courageous, full and authentic lives. Right now, our children’s rights are under attack in a more vengeful way than they ever have been in the past and the heat is focused on our trans and nonbinary children. So many of us are burned out and forget what it feels like to be in celebration. But we are not giving up. We may be tired of fighting, but we are not beaten down. We will keep fighting. We need you to fight with us.

We are now careening towards an Extra Give that once again includes organizations that allow oppressors to run alongside the oppressed. We need you to help us house our homeless because there are no beds available or enough affirming shelters. We need your support for our LGBTQ+ Health Consortium because we are still teaching our doctors about our health and bodies because most local medical facilities don’t even understand how to provide culturally humble and proficient medical care. We need you to help repair the damage the pandemic has done to our community that was already isolated and broken before the pandemic. We need you to help us with copay assistance and housing for our elders because we refuse to let the people who fought for their lives in the AIDS epidemic go back into the closet in retirement. 

The Extra Give is a perfect metaphor for Lancaster County at large. We live this every day. We need your help for direct service for our community, which desperately needs it, and we’ll continue to move the dial towards progress a little bit each day. We commit every day to the idea that we must coalesce as marginalized communities because we can’t afford to divide and settle. But we can’t do it without your help. 

My ask is this: think before you give. Give to equitable organizations like Patients R Waiting, who jumped for joy to partner with us on their vaccination clinics for Pride Month in June. Give to Common Wheel who gave our HEART Residents bikes, to Disability Empowerment Center and CAP, to folks who are humbling and doing the hard work of righting the wrongs of a legacy of hatred and bigotry.

Give to the organizations that truly need your help right now. If you truly believe Black Lives Matter and are attending Pride, give equitably and give generously if you have the privilege. Even if you’re mad at us for yelling at you because we demanded justice, or taking on too much and messing up, give grace to people and be kinder — and show up and do something. If you want to pledge your support, reach out to us at info@lgbtlancaster.org for more info.

But don’t just show up to Pride, show up with your sleeves rolled up and take action against hate every single day. Be for something and do something. Like the Steinman Foundation creating an Equity Prize and the Lancaster County Community Foundation launching the LGBT Giving Circle. Don’t come to us for our opinion on how to deal with a bigoted organization, go to them. Make a stand and say “enough is enough.”

We need your help to so we can be free to love who we love, to express our lived identity, for our teens to not continue dying from suicide at alarming rates because of hate, bullying, and lack of access to gender affirming care. We shouldn’t have to shrug our shoulders when we are forced to move our vaccination clinic because of religious bigotry. We do not deserve to fear that a trans woman will die in a male cell block because she had no choice but to risk her life in protest of police violence.

So when it comes to celebrating Pride and the Extra Give, remember this: Black Lives Matter, silence = death, religious freedom is not an excuse for hate, love is love is love. Happy Pride y’all! 🏳️‍🌈

On Gender Policing in Sports

Ellie Cochran

September 7, 2021

Gender policing in sports has a blatantly racist history, often being disproportionately performed on Black woman athletes regardless of whether their gender identity conforms with their birth assignment. Even just this year, former Polish sprinter Marcin Urbas requested Olympics organizers run a “thorough test” on Namibian athlete Christine Mboma to “find out if she definitely is a woman” after she ran a semi-final time of 21.97 seconds in the women’s 200-meter race. Mboma, an intersex athlete, was not allowed to run her signature 400-meter race due to “elevated testosterone levels.”

Including transgender athletes in sports categories that match their gender identity is the correct thing to do, full stop. Aside from being the affirming thing to do, the underlying assumptions most cisgender people make about trans bodies to justify their exclusion are incorrect from the start, and reactionary transphobes fail to consider the repercussions that gender policing in sports has on everyone, cis athletes included.

Olympic Athlete Christine Mboma

Since 2018, cis athletes including South Africa’s Caster Semenya, Kenya’s Margaret Wambui, Burundi’s Francine Niyonsaba, Namibia’s Beatrice Masilingi and others have all been banned from competing in Olympic events due to regulations surrounding differences in hormonal development. What these short-sighted and racist policies fail to take into account is the fact that training always trumps biology.

Even the occasional mutations that give a genuine biological advantage—for example, Michael Phelps’ wingspan and double-jointed ankles—aren’t gendered and aren’t useful without relevant training and practice. “One high jumper could be taller and have longer legs than another, but the other could have perfect form, and then do better,” explained Andraya Yearwood, a student track athlete and ACLU client, “One sprinter could have parents who spend so much money on personal training for their child, which in turn, would cause that child to run faster.”

The idea that there are distinct “male” and “female” hormones is misleading. Who would accuse a female-assigned cisgender woman who has elevated testosterone levels of not being a woman? In fact, ovaries themselves produce testosterone. Everybody has varying levels of chemistry determining the effects their endocrine system has on their body. Why choose to discriminate on this rather than any other biological variable, such as lung capacity or limb length or foot size?

South African athlete Caster Semenya, who was subjected to "gender testing" after the 2009 athletics world championships
South African athlete Caster Semenya, who was subjected to “gender testing” after the 2009 athletics world championships

But what about trans athletes specifically? The thing is, trans people don’t have any specific advantages categorically, since trans people come in all heights, shapes, and sizes! According to New York Endocrinologist and Executive Director of the Mount Sinai Center for Transgender Medicine and Surgery Dr. Joshua D Safer, “A person’s genetic make-up and internal and external reproductive anatomy are not useful indicators of athletic performance.” Even if a trans athlete is taller than a competitor, height doesn’t really convey an advantage either—Serena Williams is 5’9″ and still has many more grand slam titles than her taller peers.

Ultimately, the gender divide in sports is another example of a false binary that cisgender society has convinced itself is dictated by something other than consensus agreement. A trans woman who takes estrogen will have about the same muscle density and ability to generate muscle as a cis woman. Likewise, a trans man who takes testosterone can generate about the same muscle density as a cis man. Athletes regardless of hormonal chemistry achieve similar strength gains when training under the same program, and runners who are capable of similar performances do not vary widely in body composition. Wouldn’t it ultimately make more sense to bracket athletes by weight class or a similar metric rather than gender? The goal of making a talking point out of gender inclusivity in sports has never been about fairness or a love of competition—it’s a thinly-veiled push to exclude trans people from society and perpetuate a culture that sees trans identities as shameful.